About Kerry Winget

Kerry Winget, AuD, CCC-SLP/A is a licensed speech language pathologist at St. Agnes Hospital. She has been working with adults in the medical setting for over 15 years. She has special interest in swallowing disorders and treatment. She recently earned her 9th Award for Continuing Education (ACE) from the American Speech and Hearing Association.
Author Archive | Kerry Winget

June is National Dysphagia Awareness Month

Established unanimously in 2008 by the 110th US Congress, National Dysphagia Awareness Month was created to help improve awareness and recognition of the importance of early detection and treatment. Dysphagia (difficulty with swallowing) is a medical dysfunction affecting as many as 15 million Americans. Dysphagia is the leading cause of aspiration pneumonia. Dysphagia occurs in […]

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Popularity of Personal Technology With Young Children Highlights Importance of Prioritizing Verbal Communication

Guidance for Parents during Better Hearing & Speech Month With new evidence showing a majority of young children in the United States use personal technology such as smartphones and tablets, it is important that parents ensure technology is not overtaking time for talking, reading, and other verbal communication—which are the primary ways that children learn. […]

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Mealtime challenges those with dementia

Many individuals with dementia and their caregivers struggle at mealtime. This can be frustrating because many of life’s pleasurable events center on food…favorite meals, backyard grilling, party food and holiday dinners. They are happy social memories with spouses and children, relatives and friends. When mealtime becomes a frustrating and negative experience, both emotional and nutritional […]

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Technology helps with swallow exercise treatment

Speech therapists regularly develop and train clients in swallow exercises to help treat swallow difficulty caused by muscle weakness or dysfunction. Like any exercise program, the best results occur when the exercises are done regularly and repeatedly over time. Research has shown that for many patients with swallowing difficulty (dysphagia) caused by a medical condition […]

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Think LOUD: Improving Your Voice with Parkinson’s Disease

Written by: Heather Lindert, Graduate Student Intern, M.S., CF-SLP The evidence-based Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) program has been extensively researched and utilized with individuals with Parkinson’s Disease. The research found that for many individuals, the improvements in voice using the LSVT techniques lasted up to two years after completing the therapy program. What does LSVT treatment […]

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May is Better Speech and Hearing Month

Speech, language and hearing disorders are among the most common disabilities in the United States. However, unlike many other disabilities, these disorders are often reversible and even preventable with intervention. Identify the Signs is a national effort by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association to combat an overall lack of awareness about communication disorders – a major […]

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The world’s trickiest tongue twister

Stephanie Shattuck-Hufnagel, a researcher with the Speech Communication Group at MIT, recently presented the world’s trickiest tongue twister to the Acoustical Society of America.  Her research focuses on speech errors as a way of understanding normal brain function through analyzing the types and patterns of errors. The tongue twister? Say this 10 times fast: Pad […]

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Having difficulty swallowing after cancer treatment?

Normal speech and swallow function is a delicate balance of strength and agility in the lips, tongue and throat muscles. Any weakness, loss of flexibility or change in anatomy can cause speech and/or swallowing disruption and discomfort. While changes to your voice/speech may cause frustration, worsening of your swallowing safety can affect your nutrition and […]

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Cognitive therapy after cancer treatment

Many people receiving cancer treatments notice changes in their thinking and memory abilities. This may be caused by increased stress and anxiety, fatigue, poor sleep, changes in your blood chemistry, medication side effects or hormonal changes. People often report a sense of feeling more disorganized, more easily distracted, more forgetful. They also describe difficulty paying […]

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Swallowing Difficulties after Spinal Surgery

Swallowing difficult (dysphagia) is a common complication of spinal surgery.  Studies suggest that as many as 60 percent of patients experience some difficulty swallowing within the first two or three weeks after surgery.  Patients who received an anterior approach (through the front of the neck) are more likely to experience dysphagia. Previous thought was that […]

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