About Kerry Winget

Kerry Winget, AuD, CCC-SLP/A is a licensed speech language pathologist at St. Agnes Hospital. She has been working with adults in the medical setting for over 15 years. She has special interest in swallowing disorders and treatment. She recently earned her 9th Award for Continuing Education (ACE) from the American Speech and Hearing Association.
Author Archive | Kerry Winget
Woman thinking

The world’s trickiest tongue twister

Stephanie Shattuck-Hufnagel, a researcher with the Speech Communication Group at MIT, recently presented the world’s trickiest tongue twister to the Acoustical Society of America.  Her research focuses on speech errors as a way of understanding normal brain function through analyzing the types and patterns of errors. The tongue twister? Say this 10 times fast: Pad [...]

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Having difficulty swallowing after cancer treatment?

Normal speech and swallow function is a delicate balance of strength and agility in the lips, tongue and throat muscles. Any weakness, loss of flexibility or change in anatomy can cause speech and/or swallowing disruption and discomfort. While changes to your voice/speech may cause frustration, worsening of your swallowing safety can affect your nutrition and [...]

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Cognitive therapy after cancer treatment

Many people receiving cancer treatments notice changes in their thinking and memory abilities. This may be caused by increased stress and anxiety, fatigue, poor sleep, changes in your blood chemistry, medication side effects or hormonal changes. People often report a sense of feeling more disorganized, more easily distracted, more forgetful. They also describe difficulty paying [...]

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Swallowing Difficulties after Spinal Surgery

Swallowing difficult (dysphagia) is a common complication of spinal surgery.  Studies suggest that as many as 60 percent of patients experience some difficulty swallowing within the first two or three weeks after surgery.  Patients who received an anterior approach (through the front of the neck) are more likely to experience dysphagia. Previous thought was that [...]

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Lights of Love

Healthy Voice for the Holidays

The holidays are about getting together with friends and family, sharing food and stories. One of the last things you probably want to happen is to have your voice suddenly hoarse, raspy or harsh sounding. Unfortunately, many people have the start of voice concerns during the holiday season due to both increased stress, and frequent [...]

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Are you finding it difficult to swallow after cardiac surgery?

Swallowing difficulty (dysphagia) has been identified as a post-surgery complication during heart and carotid artery surgeries. Although occurring in just a small percentage of patients, less than five percent, unexpected new-onset dysphagia can be devastating to both medical and emotional recovery. In both procedures, surgeons are operating in close proximity to the cranial nerves controlling [...]

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The Silent Acid Reflux: Laryngopharyngeal Reflux (LPR)

The most commonly known acid reflux disorder is called Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD). Popular treatment medications, such as Prilosec, Prevacid and Pepcid, have catchy television commercials showing actors complaining of heartburn and indigestion. GERD is a disorder caused when the lower esophageal sphincter opens and stomach acids come back up into the esophagus. A lesser known [...]

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Why Do I Cough When I Eat?

The cough reflex is part of the body’s self-defense system against foreign particles entering the respiratory system. The trachea and upper airway have irritant receptors which sense the particles and activate the cough. The chest and throat muscles contract in sequence, resulting in a sudden, strong airflow to help expel the offending material. When people [...]

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Do You Have Trouble Swallowing Pills?

A recent national survey showed that 40 percent of adults report having trouble swallowing pills. Many admitted that they delayed or skipped taking necessary medications because of their difficulty. It also noted that more than 75 percent of those adults having difficulty hadn’t informed their doctor. Pill swallowing difficulty is usually caused by anatomical dysfunction [...]

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